IWSG: A is for Authors

InsecureWritersSupportGroup2

This is my post for the Insecure Writers Support Group AND the A-Z Challenge. I’m lazy so I’m combining the two!

A is for Author is my theme for today. According to the dictionary, an author is a writer – someone who has produced some manner of literary work. (Been there, done that.)

In my mind, author is more than that, a more high-minded sounding word than writer. I am an author means I am done. I have not only created something, but I’ve created something good. That’s the part I’m not sure about.

Despite being mostly over the winter blues, I have been a bad writer for the past few weeks. A combination of two rejections, the flu, and a weeklong visit by family, conspired to give me lots of excuses to let my writing fall majorly by the wayside. That said, I haven’t been completely idle. I’ve finished some content level edits for one novel and edited a couple chapters for another one, as well as some short fiction work. I’ve also been doing reading and research for a non-fiction book project.

How are things going for you? Are you an author? Do you feel strange using that word: author?

Good luck and much happy writing!

25 thoughts on “IWSG: A is for Authors

  1. It used to be awkward, but I’m so proud of my efforts that I proudly say I’m a writer. Of course the next question is “are you published?” Yes, indeedy. Feels good. You have plenty of excuses not to write this month. Congrats on carving out the time.

    Diane #111

  2. I didn’t call myself an Author until my first publication, which was in our local women’s magazine. In fact, it was the editor who called me that, and I sat up a little straighter, feeling that “I have arrived” feeling.
    I also combined A with IWSG.
    Play off the Page

  3. I don’t want to sound arrogant, but no; I have no problem calling myself an author. I’m published and I’m going with that. I love the word “wordsmith”. It’s all about crafting. I think we may have our different methods for creating our work but we are all wordsmiths. πŸ™‚

    Anna from Elements of Writing

    Here’s my link if you’d like to drop by πŸ™‚

  4. I do still tend to think I need to be published to consider myself an author over a writer. But I have author on my blog page because it’s something to aspire to, and I was tired of saying I was an aspiring writer. I’ve progressed past aspiring now that I have completed works under my belt.

    Here’s my post: Stephanie Scott IWSG April post

  5. I try not to let terms like author vs writer get to me. I don’t care what others think is more credible or sounds more legit. I do what I do for me and put it out there for others to try. I’m an author, a writer, blogger, and more. Thanks for sharing and good luck with your challenge.

  6. I’m happy with using the term author. I’m far from great…I’m evolving…but it takes courage, time, and work to produce stories and poetry. Best of luck with A to Z. You can do it! Stop by for a visit if you have the chance. http://nadinefeldman.com

  7. Some days I feel like an author: when I look at the short story anthologies I’ve been published in. Mostly I feel like a failed writer as I’ve been in a slump for a couple years. I guess what type of writer or author you are depends on the exact mood at the moment. Good luck with the challenge this month.

  8. I feel your pain, re: rejection. Got one in the mail a few weeks ago. SO, I feel a bit of a fraud using the word “author.” Writer, on the hand? I have no qualms about writer. I’m comfortable with writer, like snuggling-under-the-blankets-on-a-cold-winter’s-night kind of comfort. So comfortable, in fact, I think I’d still call myself a writer even when I become an author. πŸ™‚

    • Thanks V. I hear you in that! I love that metaphor. A lot of times it’s like I need to write because I love it and not for the sake of a fancy title/whatever. And that’s what that metaphor conjures up for me. Good luck with your future endeavors!

  9. Over time, there has been much debate about the author vs. writer thinggie… and you get some authors/writers who are very sensitive about it.
    Isn’t it just a matter of semantics? πŸ˜€

    • Yeah, I don’t know. In my head, I’m like yeah same difference, but it *feels* different. This is probably the kind of thing that made me amuse my 7th grade history teacher who loved to give us multiple choice tests – and I’d always be the one writing in the margins, like I can kind of see both sides on this one. I want to say it doesn’t make a difference … but it does … but it doesn’t.

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