IWSG: Good Question….

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It’s IWSG Day again and the (optional) question of the month is: How do you celebrate when you achieve a writing goal/ finish a story?

True confessions: I don’t always, because of the little voice inside my head that says don’t reward  yourself for doing something of dubious usefulness. Do you reward yourself for indulging in cheesecake? I usually have to force myself to do the rest and reward thing, because it’s important for … reasons.

I’m *supposed* to take a day off and go somewhere nice to cleanse after finishing a big project. After a shorter one, I (should) take a least an hour or so. In reality, I don’t always and when I don’t, the stress builds. This is probably a good time to remind myself why breaks are important.

1) Because writing is hard and it’s not all fun and easy like eating cheesecake.

2) Because even after you eat cheesecake, you should take time to burn off those calories.

3) Because writing is hard and it’s important, and you should treat your accomplishments like accomplishments and honor them. That way you can reprogram your brain to write better and not just because you have to.

All of this is true. I know this. Sort of. Good question!

What about you? How do you reward yourself for finishing a project? (Do you reward yourself?)

Who Came Up With This?

j-hardy-boxing-gymPHOTO PROMPT © J Hardy Carroll

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Who Came Up With This?

Way back so long ago people hadn’t invented calendars yet, two brothers came up with this great idea: we will fight each other, and people will pay us money to watch us.

Unfortunately, they couldn’t seem to agree on who came up with the idea first.

“Me!”

“No, me!”

Punches were thrown. Hair may or may not have been pulled (depending on who you “believe.”) Their fight attracted so much attention that they called it an exhibition match and sold tickets to the next one for one big gray stone each.

Thus was boxing invented.

This is my weekly submission for Friday Fictioneers, where each week we write 100-word stories in response to the prompt given to us by author and talent manager Rochelle. For more stories or to add your own, click the froggy! (Just don’t punch him too hard – he’s sensitive.)

Author’s Note: No one have ever been able to convincingly explain to me how beating up people (not oops did my hockey stick accidentally hit you – but literally knocking people unconscious on purpose) is an actual sport.  I have theories.